Are You Fucking Me Now? Twitter’s ‘Pink’ Messages Will Get You Into More Trouble

Twitter has a lot of things going for it when it comes to privacy, and one of them is that it allows users to choose their own messages.

The company is now testing a feature that allows users the option to turn on or off the ability to send or receive non-sexual messages. 

For those that are using Twitter’s new ‘Pink,’ or ‘no sexual messages’ option, the messages will not appear in their timeline. 

But for those that want to be able to send a sexual message, that means that a ‘pink’ message will appear next to your messages.

A quick Google search will reveal that the company has been working on this feature for some time, and it has been available in a few other versions of the app.

In an email to Polygon, Twitter’s Product Manager Rob Enderle said, “The majority of our customers use ‘Pink’, so we’ve made it available to users in the US.

In the UK, users will be able only choose from a limited set of options for sexual messages.”

The company is also rolling out the option for users to turn off or enable a ‘no-sexual messaging’ option.

So what does this mean?

While Twitter isn’t saying exactly what it’s trying to accomplish here, it seems that the feature is intended to allow users to send and receive nonsexual messages that don’t contain explicit content.

The issue here isn’t that you won’t see the messages in your timeline, it’s that the ones you see are not the ones that were intended to be sexual.

It’s possible that the Twitter team is looking to prevent unwanted messages, but the problem here isn, in part, that the messages that users send won’t appear in a timeline that is more explicit.

It’s unclear exactly what Twitter wants the feature to do, but one possibility is to provide a way for users who don’t want to see messages that contain sexual content to manually block them from their timeline altogether.

Twitter has not yet announced whether or not this feature will be available in the UK or elsewhere, but we’ve reached out to Twitter to see if the company plans to roll it out to other countries.